Carl Frampton beats Leo Santa Cruz for WBA Featherweight Title

Carl Frampton beats Leo Santa Cruz for WBA Featherweight Title

The featherweight division has a new champion. This happened after Carl Frampton defeated Leo Santa Cruz for the WBA Featherweight Title.

Frampton is originally a super bantamweight champion. He became the unified champion in his division by beating Scot Quigg earlier this year. The native from Northern Ireland edges Quigg with a split decision victory.

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Moreover, Carl moved up in weight after his unified belts in super bantamweight was not recognized by the WBA. This is because he did not fight Guillermo Rigondeaux, a mandatory opponent for his titles.

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But Frampton has become the new WBA Featherweight Title after he won over Santacruz of Mexico. He won in a Majority Decision bout over Santa Cruz, 117-111, 116-112. One judge scored the fight 114-114. This may be because that the fight is somehow a close one.

At the start of the fight, Frampton and Santa Cruz exchanged blows that made the fight really exciting. Both fighters had unbeaten records before the fight.

According to Dan Rafael of ESPN, the fight could be a fight of the year candidate. But he mentioned that Frampton was really the heavier hitter who did well enough to win the fight.

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The 29-year-old Irish now improves his unblemished record to 23 wins and 14 knockouts. Before going professional, Frampton represented his country of Ireland in the European Union Amateur Championships in which he won a silver medal.

Meanwhile, the formerly undefeated Santa Cruz now has a record of 32 wins with 1 defeat and 18 knockouts. The 27-year-old Mexican has defeated Kiko Martinez from Spain in February of this year with an explosive Technical Knockout in round 5.

The future is really bright for the hard-hitting Frampton.

Photo courtesy: Sinn Féin/Flickr