Williams F1 tests radical new rear wing at Barcelona

Williams F1 tests radical new rear wing at Barcelona

Williams F1 caused a stir on the opening day of the Barcelona in-season test on Tuesday by running a radical double-decker rear wing.

The double decker design, which features an extended wider plane ahead of the main wing elements, was fitted to the car for the first run of the Barcelona test. Development driver and GP2 race winner Alex Lynn did the initial run of the devices fitted.

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The Williams F1 car was also fitted with extra carbon fibre devices at the front of the car, as well as two small winglets.

The height and shape of these devices, which extend beyond what is allowed under the current FIA regulations, would suggest that they are not actually being tested ahead of an actual introduction later this year.

However, reports said that they are being run and fitted to the car to allow the team a better understanding of aerodynamic loads and tyres as well as to simulate higher-downforce requirements to improve chassis and balance.

According to Williams, the device is being tested to gain better understanding about the car in a bid to find the optimum balance.

This test will likely increase knowledge and help Williams understand the implications of greater downforce on the car and the tyres that would help both with 2016 and 2017 design concepts. The team has been reportedly hard at work in preparing for the next year’s car design.

Headquartered in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, Williams F1 is a British Formula One motor racing squad and constructor. Its one of the leading Formula One team in the world and has already won 16 FIA FIA Formula One World Championship Titles, 9 for constructors and seven for drivers’ championship.

In addition to their racing portfolio, Williams also created Williams Advanced Engineering and Williams Hybrid Power, which take technology originally developed for F1 racing and adapt it for commercial or business applications.

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