Jeremy Lin wants young players in Taiwan to improve their 3-point shooting

Jeremy Lin wants young players in Taiwan to improve their 3-point shooting

Jeremy Lin arrived in Taiwan on Friday as part of his annual tour of Asia every offseason. In his basketball camp at Kaohsiung City, Lin told young players to keep working on their three-point shooting because it’s the future of the NBA.

“The NBA players value much 3-point shooting percentage. The focus of my trainings have been to improve my three-point percentage,” Lin told Focus Taiwan News Channel.

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The 27-year-old point guard was accompanied by his high school coach, Brandynn Williams, who helped Lin teach 60 senior and junior high school basketball players. They taught basic dribbling skills and gave a few pointers in improving their training.

The camp was held on Saturday at the I-Shou University sports stadium and his visit coincided with Taiwan’s Dragon Boat Festival. It was a four-day holiday wherein Jeremy Lin and coach Williams was served “zongzi,” a traditional Taiwanese cuisine made of glutinous rice stuffed with different fillings and wrapped in bamboo.

On the other hand, Lin revealed that he quickly went back to training after his recent two-week trip to Iceland. He noted that he was disappointed with his shooting but he plans to improve it this offseason, as well as his overall defense.

In his six seasons in the NBA, Lin has only shot 34.6 percent from threes which is respectable. He only shot 33.6 percent in his first season with the Charlotte Hornets, but “Linsanity” had a great year nonetheless.

Jeremy Lin is currently in the capital city of Taipei and he will be doing many activities like fan meet-and-greet, charity events, seminars and two promotional events. His Taiwan tour ends on June 17 when flies to China.

After his annual Asia tour, Lin is expected to be courted by many teams in free agency. He is set to have a significant raise but he’s willing to return to the Hornets on a discounted deal. However, he expressed his interest in being a starter rather than a backup.

“To be happy, I need to consider a few things. Of course I am going to consider who is coaching the team, the team’s style, the players on the team and their chance of winning, as well as the on-court time I have and if I have a chance to start,” Lin told the Taipei Times.

Photo Courtesy: Gene Wang/Flickr