NFL News: Obama sides with Kaepernick, says ‘that’s how democracy works’

NFL News: Obama sides with Kaepernick, says ‘that’s how democracy works’

Barack Obama, the president of the United States, defended San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick saying that he was just exercising his “constitutional right” to protest any issues.

The US president said as well that Kaepernick’s message was lost in his way of protest and that there are other ways to send the message.

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“I think there are a lot of ways you can do it as a general matter when it comes to the flag and the national anthem and the meaning that that holds for our men and women in uniform and those who’ve fought for us. That is a tough thing for them to get past to then hear what his deeper concerns are,” Obama stated, according to Reuters.

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Obama is in China for the G20, an international forum for the governments and central bank governors from 20 major economies.

“If nothing else what he’s done is he’s generated more conversation around some topics that need to be talked about. Sometimes it’s messy, but it’s the way democracy works,” Obama added.

Some NFL fans want the league to punish the 49ers quarterback, but league officials stated players are only “encouraged” to stand up during the national anthem and are not required.

Some other fans also support Kaepernick on this issue with jersey sales for the quarterback reportedly rising the last few days.

The 49ers have supported Kaepernick throughout the controversy, saying that it’s their quarterback’s right to free expression.

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Because of the national anthem protest issue, Kaepernick’s name has been mentioned in NFL rumors that San Francisco may be looking to trade him. However, it’s not clear which teams are interested in reports saying that other team executives are angered by Kaepernick’s protest using the national anthem.

Photo Courtesy: White House/Wikimedia