After playing his fourth season as a Bronco with a Super Bowl 50 victory over the California Panthers, Peyton Manning has announced his decision to retire ending his 18-year NFL career.

The five-time NFL MVP Denver quarterback will be going out on top after helping the Denver Broncos to a huge Super Bowl victory last month over the ferocious Carolina Panthers. In addition, Manning also helped the Broncos achieve AFC West division titles, two Super Bowl appearances and one World Championship.

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The 40-year-old Manning started his career in Indianapolis after the Colts made him their number pick for the 1998 NFL draft. He played 14 seasons for the Colts and earned two Super Bowl titles for them.

Manning also earned four MVP awards, including the highly prestigious Super Bowl XLI event, before moving to Denver Broncos as a free agent in 2012.

Throughout his career, Manning set several NFL records, including league marks for passing yards and passing touchdowns. He also ties with NFL legend Brett Favre in quarterback wins. Manning, who turns 40 this month, is the only quarterback in NFL history to lead two franchises to Super Bowl titles.

“Peyton was everything that we thought he was and even more — not only for the football team but in the community. I’m very thankful Peyton chose to play for the Denver Broncos, and I congratulate him on his Hall of Fame career,” said John Elway Broncos executive vice president of football operations and general manager, via the Variety.

Manning is certainly in the discussion of today’s all-time great NFL quarterbacks and fits the phrase that describes him as the”first ballot Hall-of-Famer.” The five-time MVP holder has thrown 237 passes, with 146 completions for 1524 yards, an average of 6.4 yards per attempt. Manning also has thrown seven touchdown passes and 10 interceptions.

Below, listed are the Hall of Fame quarterbacks who played too long for their teams.

  1. Brett Favre, QB Green Bay Packers, final season: 2010
  2. Troy Aikman, QB Dallas Cowboys final season: 2000
  3. Jim Kelly, QB Buffalo Bills, final season: 1996
  4. Dan Fouts, QB San Diego Chargers, final season: 1987
  5. Joe Namath, QB New York Jets, final season: 1977
  6. Johnny Unitas, QB Baltimore Colts, final season: 1973
  7. Y.A. Tittle, QB Baltimore Colts, final season: 1964

Photo courtesy: Jeffrey Beal/Wikimedia Commons