Twitter wins bid to stream Thursday night NFL games this season

Twitter wins bid to stream Thursday night NFL games this season

Twitter wins rights to broadcast Thursday night NFL games online.

The news was first reported at Bloomberg and was confirmed by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell on Twitter on Tuesday.

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“Twitter is where live events unfold and is the right partner for the NFL as we take the latest step in serving fans around the world live NFL football,” Goodell said in a statement reported in ESPN.

“There is a massive amount of NFL-related conversation happening on Twitter during our games and tapping into that audience, in addition to our viewers on broadcast and cable, will ensure Thursday Night Football is seen on an unprecedented number of platforms this season. This agreement also provides additional reach for those brands advertising with our broadcast partners.”

Twitter was bidding against other big companies namely Verizon Communications, Yahoo, Amazon and Facebook to win the rights to stream NFL games.

Twitter and NFL have not yet disclosed the price for the package but according to Re/code, Twitter paid an amount less than $10 million while other bidders offered $15 million.

According to a press release, Twitter, together with CBS and NBC, will broadcast 10 of the 16 next fall’s Thursday night games. The remaining six games will be covered by NFL network.

Twitter users will gain full access to free live-streaming of NFL games as well as pre-game Periscope broadcasts from players and teams, giving fans an update before, during and after games. Because of this, continuous and updated reactions from NFL fans are expected to flood on Twitter during games, same with clashes between the competing team’s supporters.

This will be the first time that Twitter will stream full NFL games. Last year, they also signed a multi-year deal with NFL for regular video highlights and other contents.

The first free NFL live stream was last year with Yahoo where they paid around $20 million to stream a single regular season game.

Photo courtesy: Yoshimasa Niwa/wikimedia