Samsung Galaxy Note 7 dangerous, prone to catching fire, explosion; How to know you’re safe

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 dangerous, prone to catching fire, explosion; How to know you’re safe

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 early releases have been recalled because its alleged danger to its batteries, which is said to be prone to explosion and catching fire. Worldwide release was scheduled in a few weeks but already some users have bought the new Samsung gadget.

Advice on how to handle the defective Samsung Galaxy Note 7 gadgets were made available online, via GSM Arena. It reports that owners of the Samsung gadget can look for the “big blue S” in the phone, an indicator if it’s safe or not.

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According to other reports, the company will be making available an online database starting September 13 for owners to see if they can have their gadgets replaced.

“Now you may be wondering if there’s any way to tell which are the newly produced safe units and which are those prone to having their batteries explode. The answer is yes, there is. In every market aside from China (where the faulty batteries were never used, so this was never an issue), if you see the label below on your Galaxy Note7’s box, you’re clear,” the GSM Arena report stated.

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Call centers from the company also are on standby to provide information if their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is safe or not.

There have been some reports wherein the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 caught fire while charge, and this has caused some owners to panic.

In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has warned passengers of not bringing their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 gadget on their flights.

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“In light of recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices, the Federal Aviation Administration strongly advises passengers not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage,” the agency stated in an official statement.

Photo courtesy: Răzvan Băltărețu/Wikimedia