Nadal to follow Sharapova drug controversy route? Spaniard accused of past doping

Nadal to follow Sharapova drug controversy route? Spaniard accused of past doping

Rafael Nadal, a former tennis World No. 1 and elite player, is being accused by an ex-sports official from France who claims that the Spanish pro was suspended in the ATP Tour due to illegal drug use and not injured as previously claimed.

“They do not reveal nor positive controls nor sanctions given in tennis, but curiously it becomes known that a men’s or women’s tennis player who gets injured stays far away of the courts for months,” Roselyne Bachelot claimed in the show Le Grand 8 where she is a co-host and translated via

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“We know that Rafael Nadal’s famous injury, that stopped him for seven months, is certainly due to a positive drug test. When you see that a player stays away for months is because he is positive. Not every time, but very often.”

Nadal has suffered from various injuries in recent years and that has cost him his fall in the ATP tennis world rankings. As Bachelot claims, some of these injuries are not valid or true and that Nadal could have been secretly suspended by the ATP.

Bachelot is a former government official for France and assumed posts such as the minister of Health and Sports for her country.

The claim by the former French official is seen as another big blow to tennis, which is still recovering from the drug controversy involving Maria Sharapova, who admitted to illegal drug use and faces a lengthy ban from tennis.

Nadal has struggled to return to top form in recent years mainly due to various injuries. The Spaniard has lost his status as one of the best tennis players in the world in recent seasons with rivals Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Andy Murray, among others all continuing to play well unlike Nadal.

The accusation of Bachelot will be a challenge for Nadal, who in previous seasons claimed that he has lost confidence in his game and such has shown with his recent struggles in the tennis courts.

Photo courtesy: Valentina Alemanno/Wikimedia Commons