Roger Federer has no choice but to dwell on past as he misses the 2016 French Open

Roger Federer has no choice but to dwell on past as he misses the 2016 French Open

Roger Federer is still playing at a high level but recent injuries have sidelined him in most of the 2016 ATP tournaments. This now includes the majors at Roland Garros, the 2016 French Open, where the Swiss Maestro won seven years ago.

Federer announced his withdrawal from the second Grand Slam of the year last week and in recent interviews, the 34-year-old was left reminiscing his only win at Roland Garros in 2009.

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“I think it was the definitely the hardest to win, I think the others to some extent came too fast, too easy. For The French Open I had to wait until 2009, I tried to reinvent myself on clay a few times,” Federer said via the Roland Garros YouTube channel.

Federer won over “King of Clay” Rafael Nadal in the final in 2009 when he won his only French Open title.

“Having the best clay-court player ever made the thing extremely complicated for many players, not just for me, to win the French Open. To win was epic for me, it’s one of my favourite moments to look back on,” Federer added.

“I wanted it so badly, the crowd pushed me and when I see the moment where I fall to my knees, I still get emotional today when I watch it.”

Watch the Roger Federer interview below:

Video Courtesy: YouTube/Roland Garros

Roger Federer will be missing the first Grand Slam tournament since 1999 and has appeared in 65 straight Grand Slam tournaments.

“I am still not 100 percent and feel I might be taking an unnecessary risk by playing in this event before I am really ready,” Federer posted on his website about missing the 2016 French Open. “This decision was not easy to make, but I too it to ensure I could play the remainder of the season and help to extend the rest of my career.”

Roger Federer remains one of the top players in the game but with his struggle with injuries it might be time for the Swiss Maestro’s prime and winning Grand Slams to be over.

Photo courtesy: Vinod Divakaran/Wikimedia Commons