Retired fertility doctor accused of using own sperm to impregnate his patients faces felony charges

Retired fertility doctor accused of using own sperm to impregnate his patients faces felony charges

The retired fertility doctor who was accused of using his own sperm to impregnate eight of his patients decades ago is now facing felony charges. Court documents state that Dr. Donald Cline used his own sperm at least 50 times instead of donated sperms. The 77-year old retired fertility doctor was charged with two felony counts of obstruction of justice Friday in Marion Superior Court.

ALSO READ: NASA astronaut believes aliens exist, says ‘it would be the height of arrogance to think we are alone’

- Advertisement -

According to CBS News, Cline told six adults who believed were his children that he had donated his own sperm about 50 times starting in the 1970s, a probable cause affidavit said. Cline stated that his patients were receiving sperm from medical or dental residents or medical students and that the sperms were never used more than three times.

“I can emphatically say that at no time did I ever use my own sample for insemination,” Cline claimed in a letter to the Indiana Attorney General’s Office.

“I followed suggested guidelines of the period,” Cline wrote, according to court records. “I also did nothing morally or legally wrong.”

ALSO READ: Simple hot sex tips for men that require minimal practice

In a report published by NBC News, the retired fertility doctor’s attorney noted that the charges filed against his client Monday “arise solely from his written response to inquiries from the Indiana Attorney General’s office and nothing more. He is not accused of hiding documents, influencing witnesses or otherwise not cooperating with the AG’s investigation.” The statement also indicated that their camp would not comment further since the case is ongoing.

Cline was a popular local physician throughout his career. In 1979, Cline decided to stop his obstetrics practice and devoted himself to the field of fertility. He helped pioneer a technique to freeze the extra eggs of women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

Cline retired from his practice at Reproductive Endocrinology Associates in Indianapolis in 2009.

Photo courtesy: Iamcopphis/Flickr