USADA clears Li Jingliang’s name from clenbuterol drug abuse

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USADA clears Li Jingliang’s name from clenbuterol drug abuse

After testing positive for trace amounts of clenbuterol, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has reportedly cleared UFC fighter Li Jingliang’s name after determining that the banned substance was indeed ingested without fault.

The 28-year-old China native Jingliang has been found to have a good amount of clenbuterol in his system in a test taken just before his win against Anton Zafir. Jingliang underwent a drug test May of this year.

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“Clenbuterol is an Anabolic Agent prohibited at all times under the UFC Anti-Doping Policy, which has adopted the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List. Consistent with numerous prior reported cases globally, the issue of illicit administration of clenbuterol to animals destined for food production can result in, under specific conditions, a positive sample from an athlete,” USADA said.

“During its investigation into the circumstances that led to the positive test, USADA interviewed Jingliang and reviewed all available relevant evidence, including Jingliang’s whereabouts, dietary habits, and the laboratory reports demonstrating very low parts per billion concentrations of the prohibited substance in the athlete’s urine sample. USADA concluded that the presence of clenbuterol in the athlete’s sample very likely resulted from clenbuterol contaminated meat consumed in China,” the agency added.

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According to The Score, this is not the first time a fighter has been flagged for clenbuterol substance.

Jingliang’s fellow countryman, UFC bantamweight Ning Guangyou also tested positive. Both had undergone out-of-competition drug tests early this year and both were deemed to have acted in good faith and without fault.

Jingliang will not receive any suspension from the USADA.

Photo courtesy: Scott Lynan/Flickr