WWE News: Company set to lose millions over lawsuit hit by former champion

WWE News: Company set to lose millions over lawsuit hit by former champion

World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) has evolved with time. They have found new ways to earn money. However, the only thing they can’t get away after evolving are lawsuits. The Vince McMahon owned company seems to be on the receiving end of lawsuits every week. The latest one by their former star Rene “Dupree” Goguen may cost them millions down the road.

Former WWE tag team champion Rene Dupree is claiming royalties from his former employers over the content that the company streams on Netflix and the WWE Network. Dupree started working in the wrestling promotion from 2003 and continued until 2007 when he asked for release.

- Advertisement -

Dupree’s lawsuit deals over the language “technology not yet created” written on the contract, which in this case refers to Netflix and the WWE Network. The company has rights to all the content related to Rene Dupree during his time with the promotion. However, the 32-year-old has a problem with how the royalties are paid to the wrestlers, as reported by The Hollywood Reporter.

The lawsuit Dupree is filing against the WWE is a putative class-action lawsuit which alleges the Vince McMahon owned company of denying numerous wrestling talents of their rightful money.

This is not the first time WWE is on the receiving end of such a lawsuit. Jesse Ventura made a claim years ago against the company then known as WWF for using his identity on products which were not created during the time, like videotapes. Ventura went on to win the case, as reported by PWInsider.com.

Jerry McDevitt, WWE attorney claimed that Dupree signed a contract with the company back in 2011 which actually makes the lawsuit null and void. McDevitt cited on confidentiality and hence did not give away much on the situation.

WWE however, must take this action seriously because if proven guilty, the company may end up losing millions. The lawsuit is not going away soon and the $1.2 billion dollar worth establishment must gear up for a tough fight.

Photo courtesy: Andrew Quentin/Wikipidea.org