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Facebook Fake News: Mark Zuckerberg addresses concerns

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Mark Zuckerberg in a conference
Photo Courtesy: Brian Solis / Wikimedia

The social media that promise to ‘connect people around the word’ is now failing to stem a flood of fake news.

Countless ‘fake news’ and hoax stories made it’s way on Facebook. Mark Zuckerberg, one of the most adept leader of business world is now in deep crisis.

‘Fake news’ made a major contribution to the result of the recent United States of America (USA) election, according to allegations. Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook addresses the issue. In his open letter Facebook, he wrote:

“More than 99% of what people see is authentic. Only a very small amount is fake news and hoaxes. The hoaxes that do exist are not limited to one partisan view, or even to politics. Overall, this makes it extremely unlikely hoaxes changed the outcome of this election in one direction or the other.”

Here are some of the “very small amount’ of fake news that Mark Zuckerberg described:

Most of the stories posted on the Facebook went “trending”. But the news that circled the social media had been later confirmed to be false. Mark Zuckerberg denied that he is in relation to those ‘fake news’. However the CEO is held accountable for the spread of the false stories.

Several current and former Facebook employees according to sources, claim that there is a lot of internal turmoil about how the platform does and doesn’t censor content that users find false. Employees said that they are often told to work fast. They are only able to make a decision about a piece of flagged content once every 10 seconds.

According to CNN  Zuckerberg is now taking measures to enhance it’s ability to detect false reports. The CEO is in fact talking to several organizations to ban ‘fake news’ from entering Facebook, alongside with Google and Twitter.

Mark Zuckerberg founded Facebook together with his dorm mates when he was just 19 years old. As of the moment Facebook had 1.79 billion active users.

Photo Courtesy: Brian Solis / Wikimedia

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