Politics

How to impeach a president: People play King-unmakers

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Will January prove to be doomsday for Trump as Trump disbelievers increasingly turn to Google and search for “How to impeach a president.” Rarely has America seen such a public participation in an exercise that involves the dearest of their idols- their President. Few would have asked the question on Google even a week back but that was a week back. Trump is the new President and a hapless the public took to searching Google as a beacon of hope against the bleak dismay displayed by the results of the US elections. The question went viral as the scandals involving the President-elect are yet to be resolved. According to Metro searches that correspond to roughly “Donald Trump Impeachment” and “how to impeach a president” saw a huge surge as a triumphant Trump became more and more evident. Incidentally, the states that lean towards left beliefs were the ones that displayed the most surge in searches the same report observed. “In fact, the question has seen a monumental 4,850% rise in searches,” said Metro about the “how to impeach a president,” searches. “According to Google Trends data, the top five states frantically looking up impeachment were Hawaii, California, Oregon, Washington, and Colorado.” Politico grasped the idea long before it captured the imagination of the public, way back in April. If Trump goes full force forward on building a wall on the borders with Mexico, the threat of impeachment is very, very real. Jonathan Ashbach belonging to the Federalist noted “Of course, impeachment requires a charge. The president must be guilty of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’ But the phrase is understood to be quite broad in its application, and ultimately Congress is in practice the final judge of its meaning,” he opined “If Trump is half as corrupt as we have been told, surely some charge could be made to stick—especially if the recent allegations of sexual assault prove to be more than empty propaganda.” Though there have been impeachments before, such public initiative is unprecedented.
Picture Courtesy: Gage Skidmore/ Wikimedia Commons

Will January prove to be doomsday for Donald Trump as Trump disbelievers increasingly turn to Google and search for how to impeach a President? Rarely has America seen such a public participation in an exercise that involves the dearest of their idols- their President. This might happen due to a variety of reasons.

Few would have asked the question on Google even a week back but that was a week back. Trump is the new President and a hapless the public took to searching Google as a beacon of hope against the bleak dismay displayed by the results of the US elections. The question went viral as the scandals involving the President-elect are yet to be resolved.

According to Metro searches that correspond to roughly Donald Trump Impeachment and how to impeach a president saw a huge surge as a triumphant Trump became more and more evident. Incidentally, the states that lean towards left beliefs were the ones that displayed the most surge in searches the same report observed.

“In fact, the question has seen a monumental 4,850% rise in searches,” said Metro about the how to impeach a president searches. “According to Google Trends data, the top five states frantically looking up impeachment were Hawaii, California, Oregon, Washington, and Colorado.”

Politico grasped the idea long before it captured the imagination of the public, way back in April. If Trump goes full force forward on building a wall on the borders with Mexico, the threat of impeachment is very, very real.

Jonathan Ashbach belonging to the Federalist noted “Of course, impeachment requires a charge. The president must be guilty of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’ But the phrase is understood to be quite broad in its application, and ultimately Congress is in practice the final judge of its meaning,” he opined “If Trump is half as corrupt as we have been told, surely some charge could be made to stick—especially if the recent allegations of sexual assault prove to be more than empty propaganda.”

Though there have been impeachments before, such public initiative is unprecedented.

Picture Courtesy: Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons

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